´╗┐Teacher Winnie stands in front of a smart board.

Teacher Winnie is in her twenties, with straight brown hair in a half do. She wears glasses and a blue Homework Zone T-shirt.

She says HI I'M
TEACHER WINNIE,
TODAY WE'RE
GOING TO BE
LOOKING AT
ANOTHER WAY TO USE
A COMMA ON THE
HOMEWORK ZONE.
LET'S GO TO
THE SMART BOARD.
SO A COMMA IS USED
TO SEPARATE
THE NAME OF
A PERSON BEING
SPOKEN TO FROM THE
REST OF THE
SENTENCE.
SO I HAVE
TWO SENTENCES HERE
WHERE WE'RE TALKING
TO TWO DIFFERENT
PEOPLE.
LET'S LOOK AT
THE FIRST SENTENCE.
"TOMMY IS THAT
YOUR PENCIL?"
SO IN THAT
SENTENCE WE'RE
SPEAKING TO TOMMY
SO WE WANT TO
MAKE SURE THAT
THE READERS KNOW
THAT BY ADDING A
COMMA TO IT
AND THAT SHOWS
US WE'RE SAYING
"TOMMY," AND WE
GIVE A LITTLE
PAUSE AS
THE READER,
"IS THAT YOUR
PENCIL?"
ANOTHER GOOD
EXAMPLE IS WHEN WE
LOOK AT A SENTENCE
LIKE THIS.
LET'S
EAT GRANDMA.
WHEN YOU READ IT,
IT SOUNDS LIKE
WE'RE GOING TO
HAVE GRANDMA FOR
LUNCH AND THAT'S
NOT WHAT WE
WANT
TO SAY.
RIGHT, WE WANT TO,
WE WANT TO
TELL GRANDMA
"LET'S EAT, GRANDMA."
SO INSTEAD WE NEED
TO MAKE SURE
WE ADD THAT
COMMA IN TO SHOW
GRANDMA WE'RE NOT
GOING TO HAVE
HER FOR
SUPPER OR FOR LUNCH.
WE WANT TO SAY "LET'S
EAT, GRANDMA."
WE WANT TO TELL
HER IT'S TIME TO EAT.
SO THAT'S ONE WAY
THAT WE USE
THE COMMA TO
SEPARATE THE PERSON
WE'RE SPEAKING TO
FROM THE REST
OF THE
SENTENCE.
I'M TEACHER WINNIE AND
I HOPE THAT HELPS.